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Bartley v. Rowe

February 10, 1961

SPARIEL BARTLEY ET AL., APPELLANTS,
v.
JOHNNIE ROWE ET AL., APPELLEES.



Cullen

CULLEN, Commissioner.

In 1922, A.M. Gibson, predecessor in title to the appellants, conveyed a ten-acre tract of land to Ferman Bartley, predecessor in title to the appellees. The granting clause of the deed contained this exception:

"coal and minerals excepted which is sold."

As a matter of fact there had been no effective conveyance of the mineral rights prior to the date of this deed. The lower court held that the words "which is sold" were restrictive and since no mineral rights previously had been sold the minerals passed to Bartley and to the appellees as his successors in title. The appellants maintain that the words were merely descriptive and that the exception clause was effective to except all of the mineral rights, which thereafter passed to the appellants through mesne conveyances.

The following cases are of significance on the question: Bolen v. Casebolt, 252 Ky. 17, 66 S.W.2d 19; Powell v. Owens, 290 Ky. 108, 160 S.W.2d 383; Hale v. Hale, 297 Ky. 631, 180 S.W.2d 857; Clements v. Morgan, 307 Ky. 496, 211 S.W.2d 164; Gibson v. Sellars, Ky., 252 S.W.2d 911, 37 A.L.R.2d 1435; and Hosbach v. Head, Ky., 284 S.W.2d 684. Trouble arises because these cases are not completely reconcilable.

The cases are consistent on at least one point, namely, that an exception is not limited or made ineffective by the mere fact that a recitation of a previous sale or conveyance of the thing excepted is erroneous. So the fact that the coal and minerals had not been sold at the time of the Gibson-Bartley deed would not of itself prevent the exception from being effective.

In Bolen v. Casebolt the language of the exception was, "the mineral and timber and oil heretofore sold is excepted." [252 Ky. 17, 66 S.W.2d 19.] Actually there had been no previous sale. The court held that the qualifying words in the exception clause were merely descriptive and that there was an effective exception of all the mineral, timber and oil.

In Hale v. Hale the granting clause recited that "the coal and hard minerals * * * have been heretofore sold and conveyed and are not embraced in this conveyance." [297 Ky. 631, 180 S.W.2d 858.] The habendum clause read, "to have and to hold said * * * land with the exception of the coal and hard minerals * * * that have heretofore been sold * * *." The court held that the exception was not restricted to such of the coal rights as had in fact been theretofore sold.

In Gibson v. Sellars the exception clause was: "It is expressly understood * * * that the coal and mineral rights * * * have been heretofore sold * * * and are expressly excluded." [252 S.W.2d 911.] In fact only the coal rights had previously been sold. It was held that the words referring to previous sale were merely descriptive and that the oil and gas rights, which had not previously been sold, were excepted the same as the coal rights that had been sold.

In Hosbach v. Head the granting clause recited that "the coal rights * * * is not conveyed * * * as same was sold by R.L. Head to Henry Walker as of record in Deed Book 61, page 539." The habendum clause contained a covenant of warranty "except as to the coal and mineral rights which do not pass under this conveyance." The court held that the habendum clause must be read with the granting clause and when so read the meaning was clear that the only mineral rights excepted were the coal rights ...


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